BBC
Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Please forgive our mess. Bell Book and Candle dot org is undergoing a major restructuring. We will be up and running again soon. I am still working on a new store and it is quite a task to complete. So please bare with me while I attempt to do it.

 

Welcome to Bell Book and Candle.  I am still in process of adding and changing things and I have much work to do yet. In the mean time I thought I would give a little background to the name

"Bell Book and Candle."

There was a movie made in the 50's that was called "Bell Book and Candle" and in this movie which stared Kim Novak (she plays Gillian) and Jimmy Stewart (he plays Shepherd 'Shep' Henderson). The story is cute and I think an appropriate name for a Pagan shop.

I am going to quote IMDB now because they word it so nicely.

Gillian's cat is named Pyewacket. This name has become a popular one for cats because of this movie, but few know its origin: Pyewacket was one of the familiar spirits of a witch detected by the "witch finder general" Matthew Hopkins in March 1644 in the town of Maningtree, Essex, UK. He claimed he spied on the witches as they held their meeting close by his house, and heard them mention the name of a local woman. She was arrested and deprived of sleep for four nights, at the end of which she confessed and named her familiars, describing their forms. They were: * Holt * Jarmara * Vinegar Tom * Sacke and Sugar * Newes * Ilemauzer * Pyewacket * Pecke in the Crowne * Griezzel Greedigutt * Hopkins says he and nine other witnesses saw the first five of these, which appeared in the forms described by the witch. Only the first of these was a cat; the next two were dogs, and the others were a black rabbit and a polecat. So it's not clear whether Pyewacket was a cat's name or not. As for the meanings, Hopkins says only that they were such that "no mortal could invent." The incident is described in Hopkins's pamphlet "The Discovery of Witches" (1647).

With that said I want you to know that I am still working on this site and it will continue to be a work in progress.

Thanks for stopping by. Cheers

|Home|E-Mail|Back|

 

Bell Book and Candle 1997-2013 All Rights Reserved

Site Meter